Did you know that?

  • 1 in 7 in the US don't have enough food to eat each day- that is 48 million men, women and children in our country that are hungry every day, living in our communities.
  • The USDA Food and Nutrition Service reports that as of September 2014, there were around 46.5 million individual food stamp recipients (22.7 million households), receiving an average benefit of $123.74 each (around $257 per household).
  • According to a study conducted in late April by the U.S.Department of Education and the National Institute of Literacy, 32 million adults in the U.S. can't read. That's 14 percent of the population. 21 percent of adults in the U.S.read below a 5th grade level, and 19 percent of high school graduates can't read.
  • Immigrants in the US represent 81 million people, or 26% of the total population. 
  • Garden Street is in the Dinsmore area of Jacksonville where 84%, or 8,400 people out of 10,000, are Food Insecure and 23% of them are from Haiti or Jamaica. This is a prime location to make a difference in family's lives. We will reach them by rallying and partnering with churches and civic groups, and providing them with the tools and means they need to reach their community. The combined effort will be a model that we will take to the world.
  • Rotary Club Metro Jacksonville awarded GloDev $20,000 to build the first 30x60 commercial greenhouse for this project, and they are eagerly awaiting to be more involved as the vision unfolds. This first greenhouse is now operational!

FIGHTING POVERTY IS BIG BUSINESS. BUT WHO PROFITS THE MOST?

“I see multiple colonial governors,” says Ghanaian software entrepreneur Herman Chinery-Hesse of the international development establishment in Africa. “We are held captive by the donor community.” The West has positioned itself as the protagonist of development, giving rise to a vast multi-billion dollar poverty industry — the business of doing good has never been better. Yet the results have been mixed, in some cases even catastrophic, and leaders in the developing world are growing increasingly vocal in calling for change. Drawing from over 200 interviews filmed in 20 countries, Poverty, Inc. unearths an uncomfortable side of charity we can no longer ignore. From TOMs Shoes to international adoptions, from solar panels to U.S. agricultural subsidies, the film challenges each of us to ask the tough question: Could I be part of the problem?